Colour version, Wiltshire Council logo

 

This Emergency Plan template was produced by Wiltshire Council Conservation and Museums Advisory Service.

 

The template should be used as a guide for museums developing their own emergency plans, and is not intended to provide a final answer to all emergency planning. This is a working document. It should be adapted and expanded to suit the specific requirements of your own organisation.

 

Wherever an * appears in the plan you will need to enter your own local information.

 

Italics indicate guidance for you completing your plan and should be removed from your final document.

 

The information contained in the appendices you may want to retain within your Emergency Plan or transfer and store separately as background information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Version 1.0 August 2013

EMERGENCY PLAN

 

 

 

Copy Number: 1 of 4

 

 

Responsibility of: Reverend Tom MacMeekin

 

 

To be kept at: Market Lavington Museum

 

 

Other copies held by: 1) Reverend Tom MacMeekin

2) Mr.Bob Gordon

 

Date of copy: March 2015

 

 

This file contains confidential information, if found please return to:

Mr.R.Frost, Locksands Farm, Northbrook, Market Lavington

 

Tel: 01380 813596

Email: rogfrost @gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 


CONTENTS

 

Page

1. Emergency Plan Title Page

2. Contents List

3. Administration of Emergency Plan

4. Emergency Telephone numbers

5. Emergency Telephone Numbers

6. Emergency Team Contact Details

7.            Emergency Procedures

8.            Building and Location Plans

9.            Floor Plan

10. Location Plan

11. Location of Priority Items to be removed

12. Resources

13. Emergency Supply Box Contents List


ADMINISTRATION OF EMERGENCY PLAN

 

Name of Museum: Market Lavington Museum

 

Emergency Plan produced by:

 

Sally Reynolds Position: Secretary to the Trustees Tel: 01380 816222

 

 

Volunteers who will respond to an emergency:

 

Reverend T.MacMeekin Trustee responsible for Emergency Plan Tel: 01380 813246

Mr.R.Gordon Trustee Tel 01380 699051

Mr.R.Frost Curator Tel 01380 813596

 

Insurance Company: Zurich Municipal

Details of Policy. XAO-122028-6013 Tel.0238072 4077

 

Emergency plan updated by:

 

 

 

 

 

Plan written ............March 2015..

Plan last tested..............................

Plan last updated ..........................

 

 

(TO BE REVIEWED ANNUALLY)

 

 

 

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS

 

 

 

ORGANISATION

 

LOCAL CONTACT

 

 

REGIONAL / ALTERNATIVE CONTACTS

 

 

FIRE BRIGADE (call 999)

 

 

POLICE (call 999)

 

 

AMBULANCE (call 999)

 

ELECTRICITY COMPANY

GAS COMPANY }

WATER COMPANY }

 

BUILDERS

 

 

 

PLUMBER

 

GLAZIER

 

LOCKSMITH

 

 

 

999

 

 

999



999

 

SSEB 08000 727282

 

N/A

 

Mr.John Thynne Tel: 01380 813410

 

 

 

N/A.

See Rev.T.MacMeekin Tel: 01380 813246

 

See Rev.T.MacMeekin Tel: 01380 813246

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roses Tel: 01380 816222

B&Q Tel: 01380 829100

 

 

 


 

PRINCIPAL KEYHOLDER ROGER FROST, Locksands Farm, Northbrook,

Market Lavington tel: 01380 813596

 

Other KEYHOLDERS

 

Rev.T.MacMeekin 66 High Street, Market Lavington

tel: 01380 813246

 

Mrs.S.Frost, Locksands Farm, Market Lavington

Tel: 01380 813596

 

Mrs.S.Reynolds, Parsonage Mead, Market Lavington

Tel: 01380 816222

 

Mr.R.Gordon, 21 Church Street, Market Lavington

Tel.01380 699051

 

Mr.T.Padfield, Beech House, White Street, Market Lavington Tel; 01380 813228

 

Mr.P.Bell, Greystone House, 37 High Street, Market Lavington. Tel 01380 813305

 

Mrs.W.Lansdown, 1 Spin Hill, Market Lavington

Tel: 01380 813229

 

Mr.M.Bedford, 37 Foxley Fields, Urchfont

Tel: 01380 848816

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EMERGENCY TEAM CONTACT DETAILS

 

PERSON-FUNCTION-SKILL

NAME/ADDRESS/TEL. NO.

ROLE DURING AN EMERGENCY

Keyholders

 

 

 

 

 

Curator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CMAS

Rev.T.MacMeekin,66 High Street, Market Lavington

Tel01380 813246

 

Mr.R.Gordon, 21 Church Street, Market Lavington

Tel: 01380 699051

 

Mr.R.Frost, Locksands Farm, Nort

hb rook, Market Lavington. Tel: 01380 813596

 

Mr.T.Padfield, Beech House, Market Lavington

Tel: 01380 813228

 

Mrs.S.Reynolds, Parsonage Mead, Market Lavington. Tel:01380 816222

 

Mrs.W.Lansdown, 1 Spin Hill, Market Lavington

Tel01380 813229

 

Mr.P.Bell, Greystone House, 35 High Street, Market Lavington. Tel: 01380 813305

 

Mrs.S.Frost, Locksands Farm, Northbrook, Market Lavington Tel: 01380 813596

 

Mr.M.Bedford 37Foxley Fields, Urchfont

Tel: 01380 848816

 

01249 705524

 

Co-Ordinator

 

 

Salvage Team

 

 

Salvage Team,

 

 

Salvage Team

 

 

Emergency phone calls

 

 

Documentation: supervising completion of Emergency Response Forms

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wiltshire Council, Chippenham


EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

 

 

All incidents should be reported to the Curator. Mr.R.Frost 813596

 

Accident/Illness Make patient comfortable, If necessary dial 999 on mobile and notify family.when possible.Write report of incident in Museum message book on desk

Assault Dial 999 for Police. Write report of incident in Museum message book on desk.

Missing Person

Vandalism Take photos, make building secure, inform Police, Write report in Museum Message book.

Theft/Burglary As above

Gas Leak N/A

Oil Leak N/A

Fire If fire containable and it is safe to do so, use fire extinguisher. Evacuate building to churchyard and dial 999 for fire brigade. (Write incident in Museum message book if possible.)

Flood/ Water leak Secure artefacte against further damage having previously photgraphed same..Write incident in message book.

Storm damage Secure building and artefacts. Ring Curator Write incident in message book.

Security Risk (e.g. broken window or door) Secure building and ring Rev.MacMeekin and/or Curator.Write incident in message book

Bomb Threat Evacuate building, Ring Police 999 and inform Curator.
BUILDING LAYOUT PLANS (Key to symbols with plan)

The following are identified on the floor plan:

Locked doors: 2 Type: Entrance door: wood. Padlock and latch key.

Emergency exit. Wood. 2 x bolts

.

Fire alarms None

 

Extinguisher(s): Type: Vapourising liquid type (ABC powder)

Location: one inside entrance, one at top of stairs

 

Electricity:

Earth current )

Regulators: ) All left of entrance

Mains and fuse )

 

Water There is no water on the premises.

Chemicals or hazardous materials: None

 

Storage areas & access: Occupies part of the first floor at the far side, access up stairs, see 1st floor plan

 

Priority items for salvage: See page 11

 

Emergency response kit: Box under front desk

 

Assembly Point: In Churchyard

 

Emergency Exits: Washouse, through kitchen to left of front door

 

Roof access: First Floor

 



LOCATION OF PRIORITY ITEMS TO BE REMOVED

 

 

Accession No.

 

Location

image

G4461.1)

G4611.2)

G4611.3)

 

 

G2694 T&O 166

 

G2696 T&O 168)

G2696 T&O 167)

 

G2400 H72

 

G2709 H239

 

G1206 G1215

 

G2693 H236

 

 

G2417 H218

 

 

 

G2399 H73

 

 

G2409 H22

 

 

Millenium photograph albums

 

 

Accession books- 4

 

Mr.Lyes Tankard

 

Mr.Lyes medallions

 

 

Cup

 

Merritt Family Bible

 

Basket-making and other tools

 

18th century bottle

 

 

Ornamental sailor

 

 

 

Teapot

 

 

Food warmer

 

Upstairs on open shelving in first room

Store, on shelves

 

Showcase H

Showcase H

 

Showcase H

Round table

Wash house

 

Showcase I

 

Showcase I

 

Showcase I

 

Showcase H

 

 

 



Resources

 

Within the museum:

 

First Aid Kit : In kitchen table drawer

 

Emergencies Box: Under front desk

 

Outside the museum:

 

Local Council: Wiltshire County Council, By thesea Road, Trowbridge

 

Transport Bus Services: Faresaver Tel: 01249 444444

Salisbury Red Tel: 01202 338 420

 

Equipment hire: WCC, Roses Ironmongers, Gaigers Builders

 

Support Organisations:

 

 

Name

What they can provide

Contact

Wiltshire Council Conservation & Museums Advisory Service

Conservation and collections care advice and support. Site visit. Liaising with other organisations.

CMAS

Wiltshire & Swindon History Centre

Chippenham

01249 705500

cmas@wiltshire.gov.uk

SW Conservation Development Officer

 

 

 

 

Advice about conservation

Problems. Site visit.

Liaising with other

Organisations.

Helena Jaesche

RAAM Queen St. Exeter

T:01392 265951

Mob: 0773 2534115

Jelena.jaesche@exeter.gov.uk

 

 

 

 

MUSEUMS EMERGENCY SUPPLY BOX CONTENTS LIST

 

 

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

 

Heavy duty rubber gloves x 2 pairs **

Latex gloves x 10 pairs **

Goggles x 2

Aprons

 

Stationery

 

Tools

2 screw drivers

Pliers

File

Stanley knife and 2 packets of blades

Scissors

Tape measure

 

Mop )

Bucket ) In store room

Dustpan and brush )

Broom )

 

 

Materials

Cleaning cloths ('J' cloths)

Plastic grip seal bags - various sizes - several hundred **

Refuse bags x 8**

Paper towels (white on a roll)

Duct tape

Crepe bandages

 

Miscellaneous

First Aid Kit *

10m Extension reel 13 amp (with circuit breaker) ***

Torch and batteries and spares **

 

Box location within museum : Under desk to right of front door

 

* check expiry dates. **check periodically and replace as necessary *** maintain electrical checks

 


APPENDIX 1 - GENERAL SALVAGE INSTRUCTIONS

 

Set up clean, dry secure area for sorting and handling objects. This may be in another building, if the building you are in is susceptible to further flooding etc. Handle wet objects with great care: wet paper disintegrates, wet textiles are heavy.

 

Cleaning

 

Do not attempt to clean museum objects, unless instructed by a conservator.

 

Do not rub or brush any surfaces.

 

Do not open books.

 

 

Handling

 

Label objects while in situ - if possible photograph objects as they are in the site of the emergency.

Pick objects up from underneath using both hands.

 

Try to prevent further stress damage by supporting objects when packing them.

 

Isolate wet objects.

 

Wear gloves for your own protection.

 

 

Recording

 

Use soft pencils for marking labels and filling in record sheets.

 

Do not allow staples, paperclips, sticky tape or any pens to come into contact with wet material.

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 2 CONSERVATION ADVICE NOTES

 

ACTION IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING AN EMERGENCY


 

A: Secure objects from further primary damage:

- fire put out

- water flow cut off

- objects in situ isolated e.g. polythene sheet over objects

- objects secure from theft, vandalism etc.

 

There will be little that can be done about the primary effects of an emergency, they have happened.

 

BUT there is now a lot that can be done to minimise damage that can result from secondary effects.

 

B: Action which can be taken to minimise secondary damage will depend on the type and scale of the emergency.

 

No action can be taken until it has been cleared by the Emergency Services if present.

 

Do not rush in - Salvage without thought and planning will do more damage at this stage than leaving objects where they are.

 

Protect objects from a second emergency:

- weather, cover with tarpaulins or polythene sheet

- secure from theft, vandalism

- secure from unnecessary handling, interference

- secure from physical damage e.g. collapsing shelves

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telephone a conservator with useful information:

- who you are

- where you are

- where the emergency is

- what type of emergency

- what stage emergency is at, is primary emergency is over (fire out

etc) or is it still happening

- which areas of collections, which materials have been affected

- what have you done so far to salvage objects

- any supplies that you want conservator to bring to help salvage

- how many helpers are available

- anyone else you want conservator to telephone

 

HAVE A CUP OF TEA, SIT DOWN & THINK

 

 



Identify priorities for next action -This may well depend on advice given by emergency services personnel/conservators

 

Courses of action that might be possible at this stage:

 

1. Leave objects where they are and wait for a conservator to arrive. While you are waiting the following may be possible, depending on conditions and advice of conservators:

 

Maintain immediate post-emergency conditions for most objects. If wet/damp, do not put on radiators, out in the sun etc. to dry out.

 

  Retrieve museum documents. If wet these should be dried out naturally do not put on radiators/near heat sources.

 

  Leave objects in situ - this will facilitate recording, identification, collection of broken pieces. Salvage should be a planned orderly operation to minimise further damage and maximise information retrieved.

 

  Record objects in situ:

- Photograph them

- Sketch plans showing where broken pieces are

- New labels if possible where objects are

 

  Identify and prepare secure location to remove objects to

 

  Ensure route to secure location clear

 

  Collect new boxes, crates, baskets, carriers etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.            Salvage some objects before conservator arrives.

 

  Salvage team leader to instruct team on procedures.

Who responsible for what?

 

  Salvage team leader to determine order in which materials/areas to be retrieved.

 

  Identify secure location to move objects to. Be sure there is no risk of second emergency.

 

  Ensure route to secure location clear.

 

  Protect Personnel - gloves, hard-hats, wellingtons, overalls, masks etc. (N.B. trousers should always be on the outside of wellingtons to stop things dropping inside your wellies.)

 

  Labels objects in situ

 

  Record location in situ, mark on a plan of area.

 

  Provide supports and containers for objects and boxes. As a result of heat and/or water damage objects will be wet, heavy, very fragile, squidgy, dirty, contaminated and smelly.

 

  Put objects and cardboard boxes on or into something, to remove from scene. Storage materials will also be weakened.

 

  If objects are jumbled up retrieve in whole areas. Label and record areas salvaged. Objects can be sorted out later.

 

 

 

 

 

  Keep wet/damp objects separate from dry objects when removing from scene and keep well separated at new location.

 

  Broken objects: sweep up all the bits including fragments, dirt, remains of packaging etc. These can be sorted through later.

  Ensure objects are well supported.

 

  Separate items if possible without tearing otherwise leave.

 

  DO NOT attempt to clean objects in any way. This can be done later. Hasty cleaning may cause damage, staining, tearing at this stage.

 

  In general maintain post emergency conditions (wet, damp, dry) until conservator arrives.

 

  Wet/damp organic materials - keep as cold as possible to inhibit mould growth, 5 - 10 degrees C. Keep damp and cold unless otherwise advised by a conservator.

 

  Framed pictures which are sealed into frames with glazing (glass or Perspex) may have to be removed from the frames if water inside.

 

  Photographs - first aid will depend on processes and substrates used (will need specialist conservation advice).

 

  Wet/damp metal objects - can be dried unless otherwise advised by conservator, to minimise risk of corrosion. But only if there are no organics attached (e.g. wood handles). Allow to dry naturally. Do not place in sun or on radiators.

 

 

 

 

 

In the longer term it may be advisable for some wet organic materials to be frozen prior to conservation. Wiltshire Council Conservation Service can advise on this.

 

  Archaeological metal objects

 

If have polythene boxes and silica gel available seal objects in boxes with about 1Kg silica gel for a 30 cm x 30 cm (12 x 12) box.

 

Do not have silica gel in direct contact with the objects.

 

Place silica gel in perforated plastic bag.

 

Replace gel as soon as goes from orange to green

 

  Wet/damp ceramics, glass, stone

 

If dirty, stained, contaminated, keep wet/damp but as cold as possible (5 - 10 degrees C).

 

If clean, not stained and if no possibility of soluble salts in water allow to air dry naturally.


 

 

APPENDIX 3 EMERGENCY COLLECTION AUDIT FORM

 

For use by any person(s) responsible for checking/moving the collection after an emergency or supervising its removal from the museum.

 

Recorder: . Date: ..

 

Object No

Original

Location

Description

Type of Damage

Box/Crate No

New Location

Moved by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 4 - BACKGROUND INFORMATION TO ASSIST IN COMPILING AN EMERGENCY PLAN

 

PLANNING FOR EMERGENCIES


 

1. Some considerations:

 

Who is responsible for developing your museums Emergency Plan?

 

List people who have access to the museum and museum stores. Also list all key holders in and out of museum opening hours. Where are the display case keys held?

 

Note where the nearest telephones are in or near to your museum. Also note location of alarms and alarm bells.

 

Who is responsible in case of emergencies for the safety and organisation of people and/or objects? List contact names, addresses and telephone numbers, both during and after normal museum opening hours.

 

Are there any security measures already in place? What are they and when were they last reviewed?

 

List objects of priority for quick evacuation within the collection. Note the location of museum records/paperwork.

 

Who will train existing staff/volunteers in using the Emergency Plan?

Also who will review, evaluate, update and test the plan?

 

 

 

 

2. Simple Precautions

 

Routine checks of the building and collection should reduce the risk of emergencies happening. Establish and maintain good housekeeping procedures and security, both of which should be reviewed regularly.

 

Keep duplicates of any paperwork that the museum could not function without - not just accession registers/catalogues.

 

It is important to raise awareness and train people for dealing with emergencies as it may not be practical/possible to read through the plan when the emergency is happening.



BEFORE AN EMERGENCY - DO

 

                     Contact your local Police Crime Reduction/Community Liaison Officer for advice on improving security.

 

                     Contact your local Fire Brigade Fire Safety Department for advice on fire prevention.

 

                     Create a written emergency plan, including building plan.

 

                     Train staff/volunteers in emergency procedures/drill annually.

 

                     Keep duplicate documentation records off the museum site - all important paperwork.

 

                     Store emergency containers/plastic sheeting on top of racking. (They might catch some water it there was a flood from above.)

 

                     Regularly check drains, pipes, tanks, including the building and roof etc.

 

                     Know location of, and mark, mains water stop cock/mains switches/fuse boxes.

 

                     Check rainwater guttering.

 

                     Lag water pipes.

 

                     Label pipework - gas, water, electric etc.

 

                     Plan stores/displays etc for ease of evacuation of people/ objects, and to minimise damage if pipes burst etc.

 

                     Have an emergency supply box/kit.

 

                     Electric equipment checked annually and safe.

 

                     Have objects at least 6" off floor if possible.

 

                     Store flammable chemicals etc in metal flame-proof cabinets.

 

                     Store records in metal flame-proof containers, separate from the above.

 

                     Know where the fire extinguishers are - how to use - and that they are maintained.

 

                     Security keys, doors, windows.

 

                     Invigilation system for visitors/researchers/galleries.

 

AFTER AN EMERGENCY - DO NOT .......

 

  Become a casualty

 

  PANIC - Keep to emergency plan. Explain clearly what is to happen/delegate specific jobs etc.

 

  Get in the way of Emergency Services.

 

  Be a hero.

 

  Carry too many boxes/objects/things at a time.



APPENDIX 5

 

EFFECTS OF FIRE/FLOOD ON DIFFERENT TYPES OF MATERIALS

 

Flood or fire the order of vulnerability of materials is much the same.

 

Effects will include: destruction to varying degree, loss of information, financial e.g. costs of conservation.

 

In general organic materials are the most vulnerable to damage or complete destruction.

Paper

Photographs

Books

Paintings watercolour Increasing vulnerability

Paintings oils in the event of fire or flood

Textiles

Leather

Natural History

Wood

Bone and Ivory

Composite objects

Glass

Plastics

Ceramics unglazed

Ceramics glazed

Stone

 

 

 

 

 

 

Materials may have been fragile before an emergency, if they survive they will be even more fragile afterwards.

Conservation treatments will also be affected e.g. adhesives fail, lacquers and consolidants changed.

Damage resulting from an emergency can be:

 

  Primary, as a direct result of the emergency

  Secondary, e.g. on going deterioration as result of water or physical damage in salvage due to human haste.

 

FIRE DAMAGE

Type of Damage

Primary

Secondary

Organic

burn - complete destruction

 

burn - incomplete destruction

loss information, brittle (if dry), dirt, soot

 

effects of flood if water used

none

 

effects of extinguisher: physical

 

water: as for flood

 

Metals

melt, distort, buckle, change in metallographic structure, dirt, soot

effects of extinguisher

 

water: as for flood

Glass

melt, physical damage, crack, break, dirt, soot

effects of extinguisher

Ceramics

Stone

glazes melt, adhesives fail, colour change, physical damage, crack, break, dirt, soot

effects of extinguisher

Plastics

burn , melt

 


 

FLOOD DAMAGE

 

Type of Material

Primary

Secondary

Organic

get wet, become fragile, heavy, dissolve, rapid increase in moisture content - swell, warp, dirty, contaminated

 

inks, dyes, paints - run

 

adhesives swell, dissolve, fail.

mould, shrink, warp, loss of information, stiff, chemical reactions.

Metals

get wet (little - no primary damage)

 

dirty contaminated

Corrosion activated

Glass

chemical damage will depend on composition and stability of glass

 

physical damage

 

dirty, contaminated

soluble salts if water salty

Ceramics

Stone

physical damage

failure adhesives

 

dirty, contaminated

 

crumble, dissolve

(unfired clay, geological samples)

disruption by soluble salts if water salty

 

chemical reactions

 


APPENDIX 6

 

STORAGE AND DISPLAY CONSIDERATIONS TO MINIMIZE OBJECT DAMAGE IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY

 


1. General

 

Identify the locations of different types of materials on the museum plan.

 

Record location of objects on display with photographs and/or sketches.

 

In stores organise objects by material type wherever possible. In this way priority areas will be easier to identify.

 

Avoid overcrowding.

 

Do not leave objects in gangways.

 

Avoid combined stores of objects with other combustible materials e.g. empty boxes.

 

FLOODS usually come from above (burst pipes, tanks) but accumulate below.

 

Avoid putting objects on unprotected top shelves and directly on the floor. Objects on the floor should be at least 6" off the ground.

 

If you have to put objects on top of shelves or on the floor ensure that they are protected by packaging and that they are those materials least likely to be damaged.

 

FIRE REQUIRES: FUEL + OXYGEN + IGNITION

 

FUEL: artefacts, storage materials, case furniture and fittings.

 

OXYGEN: supply can be reduced by ensuring that fire doors are used properly - kept shut. Windows kept shut.

 

IGNITION - reduce risk by

- no smoking

- separate activities, e.g. have stores as far as possible from working and eating areas

- restrict access to stores

- ensure that all electrical equipment (portable and fixed) is checked regularly. This includes lighting and environmental control equipment. (Electricity at Work Regulations 1989).

 

2. Storage and Display Materials

 

SHELVING: Wood or metal? Each can cause problems in the event of an emergency but if you have an idea of what could happen then you are better equipped to cope if disaster happens.

 

Mark different types (wood, metal) of shelves on plans.

 

Reflective tape on ends and corners of shelves would help if lighting fails.

 

Metal shelves - conduct heat. If heat excessive shelves may warp and buckle. Shelves and load bearing structures can collapse. Hot metal can cause serious burns to people.

 

All metal interior fittings should be classified fireproof.

 

 


Wood shelves - in the event of fire may burn and collapse before artefacts, boxes etc ignite.

 

BOXES: Cardboard auto ignition temperature c. 250 degrees C (451 degrees F)

 

Polythene melting point 120 degrees C

polypropylene melting point 165 degrees C

polystyrene melting point 95 degrees C

 

silica gel melting point > 1000 degrees C

 

CABINETS: Use fireproof cabinets for most important and vulnerable material whenever possible, including museum documents.

 

3. Pipes

 

Labelling: British Standard 1710 'Identification of Pipelines and Services 1984.' Defines colour codings for different uses of pipes. Pipes should be identified at junctions, either side of valves, etc.

 

Labels are colour coded, can have text and additional safety colours and arrow to identify flow direction.

 

Basic Identification Colours:

green.......water

grey.........steam

brown.......oils

yellow.......gases (not air)

purple.......acid/alkalis

blue..........air

black........other liquids

orange.........electrical

 

Additional safety colours to highlight additional warnings

 

red..........fire fighting equipment

yellow........danger warning

darker bluefresh water

 

Other labels for hazards, flammables etc are available.

 

4. Detectors

 

Smoke: The Fire Officer can advise. But even smoke alarms available in DIY shops are better than nothing.

Heat

Gas

Water (flood detectors):

Burglar alarms: The Crime Prevention officer can advise.

 

5. Fire Fighting Equipment

 

Since all work places are now required to undertake regular fire safety audits, the Fire Brigade no longer routinely give advice, although they are responsible for enforcing fire safety regulations.

 

However you can still contact your local Fire Safety Department for information on fire safety in the workplace.

 

Fire fighting equipment (extinguisher, blankets etc) must comply with the Fire Officers requirements but where a choice is possible choose systems which will cause least damage to an object.

 

Effectiveness in extinguishing fire obvious first priority.

 

 

 


Built In Extinguishing Systems

 

Water - if possible keep water contact with objects to a minimum in event of false alarm. Sprinklers with automatic precision delivery are most effective in preventing spread of fire. (Installed in Royal Library of Scotland; as paper conservators have commented, it is possible to conserve wet books but not burnt ones).

 

Risk of accidental discharge very low, (supply company will normally charge for call out to refill extinguishers). Need temperature of 68 degrees C to activate. Leakage most likely just after installation.

 

Portable extinguishers

 

Type A Water

Fights 'Type A' fires - solids, e.g. wood, paper, plastic, upholstery etc.

It works by cooling and removing heat.

 

Type AB Foam

Fights 'Type A & B' fires - solids, e.g. wood, paper, plastic, upholstery etc. plus flammable liquids. On Type A fires it works by cooling and removing heat on Type B fires it works by forming a film over the surface of the liquid and excluding oxygen.

 

Type B & Electrical CO2

Fights electrical fires and flammable liquids.

CO2 is an asphyxiate and removes oxygen effectively smothering the fire.

One of its main advantages is the lack of mess after use.

 

Type AF Wet Chemical

Specifically designed to fight fires involving cooking oil and fat and

employs a method called soponification (turning to soap). It can also have a cooling effect and could be used to fight 'Type A' fires - solids, e.g. wood, paper, plastic, upholstery etc.

 

Type ABC & Electrical - Powder

Multi-class extinguisher fights solids, flammable liquids, flammable

gasses and electrical fires. It is a very fast acting extinguisher. However it has little or no cooling-effect so reignition can be a danger. Leaves significant mess.

 

All extinguishers, if successful in putting out a fire will leave a mess and contaminate objects. If a choice is possible then powder may cause less damage to objects than water.

All extinguishers need servicing annually.



Appendix 7 Risk Assessment template

 

Risk

Cause/Impact

Risk Owner

Controls in place to manage risk

Risk rating

(based on 3 x 3 grid)

Further actions necessary to manage risk

Risk action owner

Date for completion of action

Date of review

 

What is the cause of the risk?
What will the impact be?

Who is responsible for monitoring the risk?

What controls are fully in place now?

Insignificant

Low

Medium

High

Extreme

Do you accept this level of risk?

If yes, no further action is required.

If no, decide what further actions need to be taken to manage the risk and list them here.

Identify those responsible for each action